Research

Since the beginning of our project in October 2004, we have developed monolithic nanoporous carbon from corncob with a storage capacity of 118 g methane/liter carbon, or 180 times its own volume (180 V/V, 100% of the DOE target for NG) and 238 g methane/kg carbon (140% of the best carbon in the literature), at 500 psi and ambient temperature.

We use corncob as feedstock because it is an abundant, renewable raw material native to the Midwest, ensuring low tank costs and economic benefits for corn-producing states. We have manufactured over 300 monoliths, installed them in a prototype tank and fuel delivery system constructed by MRI, and deployed the complete ANG system on a NG vehicle on loan from the Kansas City Office of Environmental Quality.

The tank is currently being road-tested in Kansas City.  It was showcased at a press conference in Kansas City, February 16, 2007 (MU Press Release, MRI Press Release, NSF Press Release).

For hydrogen, our best storage capacity is 40 g hydrogen/liter carbon and 80 g hydrogen/kg carbon (8 mass%) at 700 psi and liquid nitrogen temperature, which is about 90% and 130% of the 2010 DOE volumetric and gravimetric target for hydrogen (excluding cryogenic components), respectively, and better than that of any previous carbon in the literature.

For hydrogen, our best storage capacity is 40 g hydrogen/liter carbon and 80 g hydrogen/kg carbon (8 mass%) at 700 psi and liquid nitrogen temperature, which is about 90% and 130% of the 2010 DOE volumetric and gravimetric target for hydrogen (excluding cryogenic components), respectively, and better than that of any previous carbon in the literature.